1 May 2018 / Magazine Scans Photoshoots / No Comments

Unafraid and unrehearsed, Zoey Deutch is the most down-to-earth rising star born to two ’80s Hollywood powerhouses you’ll ever meet.

Zoey Deutch is stuck in traffic. The Los Angeles native is clearly accustomed to gridlock, because she proceeds to describe it over the phone with the smooth and appraising air of a connoisseur. “I’m not sure if you’re familiar with L.A. traffic, but it is the most fun,” she jokes. “A thrill.” Seconds later, the actress briefly interrupts our conversation to honk at an aggressive driver who has just darted into her lane (I can hear the beep of her horn—it’s quick and direct, as even-tempered and levelheaded as a honk can get). “I’m so sorry this is happening,” Deutch apologizes. “Thank you for going with it. You’re so nice.”

For the record, Deutch is the nice one. The 23-year-old actress seems genuinely concerned about me, and I’m genuinely concerned about… me. I want to ask Deutch about her latest projects, her meteoric ascent to stardom, but haven’t found an artful way to steer the conversation away from traffic (“Hey, you know what isn’t stuck in the slow lane? Your career!”). And because Deutch is a busy actress with a very busy schedule, I’m keenly aware that every passing moment is a missed opportunity. So I blurt out a question about the Academy Awards, which Deutch recently attended in an eco-conscious couture gown by Elie Saab—a look that was put together by her stylist, Elizabeth Stewart, and roundly praised by the fashion community. “That was so powerful,” Deutch says of the Oscars. “I was able to watch all of my heroes celebrate their work. And then I got to mingle and trip over things and desperately search for snacks.”

And there it is. Into this static-filled connection, Deutch reveals all of the qualities that make her a rare and compelling figure in Hollywood. She’s a major star without a major ego, a leading lady who can appreciate both high art and snack food. She stays grounded in the glare of the spotlight and seems to have a natural immunity to hype.

The question is: How?

The daughter of actress Lea Thompson (Back to the Future) and director Howard Deutch (Pretty in Pink), Zoey Deutch grew up in the San Fernando Valley “surrounded by cool artists.” I ask Deutch if she thinks her close proximity to the business might account for her pragmatic view of it. “Look, all artists pull from their personal experiences, and anyone who tells you that isn’t the case is out of their mind,” she says. “But growing up in this business definitely gave me a unique perspective on the job. I learned early on to value preparation. I take that seriously.”

In other words, Deutch does her homework—and it shows. The young actress has built an impressive catalog of work since her big-screen debut in 2013’s Beautiful Creatures, in which she holds her own alongside the likes of Emma Thompson, Viola Davis and Jeremy Irons. But it’s in the new indie film Flower that Deutch finds a vehicle for her startling versatility and is able to display her deep commitment to her craft. Deutch plays Erica Vandross, a proudly irreverent 17-year-old who uses her sexuality to extort money from older, ostensibly powerful men who take advantage of people. “The character felt so complicated, frustrating and fragile to me,” says Deutch. “My initial thoughts when I read the script were, ‘I can’t believe they’re going to let me make a movie where the central character gets to do this kind of stuff and talk like that.’ I feel like I’ve been sitting on the sidelines watching all my male actor friends get to play parts like this.”

To prepare for what she calls a “dream role,” Deutch read books on “teenage angst and struggle,” such as Beatrice Sparks’ Go Ask Alice and Mary Pipher’s Reviving Ophelia. She and director Max Winkler researched borderline personality disorder (“I feel strongly that Erica suffers from it”) and attended a therapy session together. “I was half my character and half myself, and the therapist knew I was playing a part in Max’s film. I know it sounds silly, but it was awesome.”

While Deutch tapped into her character’s psychology, the film itself taps into the zeitgeist. “We made this movie before the Harvey story broke,” Deutch says, referring to the allegations of sexual assault brought against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein that prompted the global #MeToo movement. “It’s not a secret that this business has a very unequal power struggle and that women have been taken advantage of and preyed upon for as long as its inception. And this movie was written as a way to capture that feeling of powerlessness. It’s not like my character handles it in a productive way—she doesn’t. And even though the movie doesn’t provide answers, it reflects how women want to get some kind of control over their lives.”

The message resonates with Deutch, who is an ardent supporter of women’s rights and the Time’s Up campaign against gender discrimination. I ask her if she feels a certain responsibility as a young woman actor to keep the momentum going, and to push hard for change both inside and outside her industry. Her answer is startling—and heartening. “A responsibility? Maybe. But I think what’s even more powerful is that I feel inspired and encouraged to be a strong, independent person. It’s not that I’m being forced to take a stand. I’m excited for the future.”

The future may be fixed in her gaze, but Deutch is still committed to realizing longtime goals. Her upcoming project, Set It Up on Netflix, is the result of a pact she and her Everybody Wants Some!! co-star Glen Powell formed a few years ago. “Glen and I vowed that we would find a smart, funny romantic comedy and then we would make it. And we freaking did it.” In the film, Deutch and Powell play overworked, undervalued assistants who coax (read: trap) their bosses into a romantic relationship in order to score a little free time for themselves. The story is lighthearted, playful and easy to digest, but it still manages to unravel stubborn stereotypes, most notably, the cliché of the one-note female love interest. “I feel like it’s a truly feminist version of a romantic comedy,” says Deutch, whose character, Harper, provides the comedic and dramatic substance of the story. “I’ve played a one-dimensional female character in a male-driven comedy before, and that is a very difficult thing to do well,” she says. “You know that famous line about how there are no small parts, only small actors? I think that’s bullshit. As an actor, you really are at the mercy of the words you’re given to say. I will try to follow the well-written word. But I won’t try to manipulate a path for my career. I want to have the opportunity to play different people and keep mixing it up. That’s important to me.”

One thing’s for certain: Whichever path or direction Deutch decides to take, the actress will most definitely be in the driver’s seat. Don’t try cutting her off.

6 April 2018 / Screencaptures Television / No Comments
29 March 2018 / Flower Screencaptures Television Videos / No Comments

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25 March 2018 / Magazine Scans / No Comments

Scans from Glamour USA (April Issue) have been added to the gallery

25 March 2018 / Interviews Screencaptures Videos / No Comments

Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb talk to Zoey Deutch about her role as a misunderstood teenager in the upcoming film “Flower.”

25 March 2018 / Flower Interviews Photoshoots / No Comments

If most teen movies are concerned with a loss of innocence, then Max Winkler’s new film Flower, out this week and starring Zoey Deutch, is not your typical teen movie. In Flower, the 23-year-old Deutch plays Erica Vandross, a seventeen-year-old whose sexual confidence far outstrips her certainty in other parts of life. Her modus operandi is to offer blow jobs to men she can extort for money, saving up so that she can bail her father out of jail. The film starts with her giving one of these blow jobs to a policeman (“Where’d you learn to give head like that?” he gasps. “Middle school,” she says impassively) and ends with a visit to prison. In between, there’s a crusade to bring down a male teacher that her stepbrother Luke, played by Joey Morgan, has accused of molestation as well as a Thelma and Louise-esque escape attempt, with Luke and Erica speeding across a Joshua tree-punctuated landscape in a stolen Saab convertible and dressed in clothes seemingly inspired by Floridian retirees—Erica in particular has a penchant for flamingo-colored sunglasses and palm-tree prints. The showdown, when it comes, is emotional, not physical, and involves a seemingly innocuous moment that causes Erica to break down in Luke’s arms.

“I think that ultimately most movies portray vulnerability as a loss of innocence, but by the end of this movie, it’s the opposite direction,” says Deutch, who in real life speaks with the same breakneck cadence as her character. Though the plot is driven largely by some decisions of dubious morality on Erica’s part, the audience feels at least empathetic, if not quite sympathetic, toward her—a fact that speaks volumes about Deutch’s ability to tap into the subtleties of being human and, more specifically, a teenager who’s desperately trying to cover her fear of abandonment. “You have to believe that beyond all of Erica’s bravado there’s this fragile girl,” points out Deutch. “A movie like Flower is about the regaining of innocence and about the learning process of allowing yourself to be vulnerable.”

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4 March 2018 / Appearances / No Comments

Zoey attended the 2018 Film Independent Spirit Awards yesterday and i have added 65 HQ pictures to the gallery. More soon!

3 March 2018 / Other News / No Comments

Zoey Deutch has joined Suzy Amis Cameron’s Red Carpet Green Dress (RCGD) 2018 Oscars campaign. Deutch who stars in the upcoming film, FLOWER, will be wearing an eco-conscious gown designed by an established global designer that will be revealed at the 90th Academy Awards ® on Sunday in Los Angeles. Deutch along with Lakeith Stanfield (Get Out, Atlanta, Sorry To Bother You, The Girl In The Spider’s Web)) will both represent RCGD at the biggest awards ceremony in Hollywood.

RCGD was founded by actress, environmental advocate, educator and wife of director James Cameron, Suzy Amis Cameron back in 2009, and has worked with internationally acclaimed designers to dress stars in ethical formal wear and jewelry for the Academy Awards®. Deutch and Stanfield are among a wide variety of celebrities who have partnered with the sustainable campaign including Emma Roberts (American Horror Story, Scream Queens), Sophie Turner (X-Men, Game of Thrones), Naomie Harris (Moonlight), Gina Rodriguez (Annihilation, Jane the Virgin), Kellan Lutz (Twilight), Jake McDorman (American Sniper) and Missi Pyle (Gone Girl).

A vibrant, diversely talented and charming actress, Zoey Deutch last starred in Ry Russo-Young’s BEFORE I FALL, which premiered at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival to rave reviews. This year she will star in a trio of films including Max Winkler’s FLOWER starring opposite Kathryn Hahn and Adam Scott, which opens March 16. Additionally, she will star opposite her sister Madelyn Deutch in THE YEAR OF SPECTACULAR MEN, which is also written by Madelyn and directed by their mother Lea Thompson. MarVista will release the film in June. And finally, she stars opposite Glen Powell in the romantic comedy SET IT UP, which Netflix will release July 13. She recently wrapped production on RICHARD SAYS GOODBYE opposite Johnny Depp, which will debut late 2018. Recent credits include REBEL IN THE RYE opposite Nicholas Hoult, EVERYBODY WANTS SOME!! from writer/director Richard Linklater, WHY HIM? opposite Bryan Cranston, and DIRTY GRANDPA opposite Robert De Niro and Zac Efron.

Partnering with RCGD this year is Absolut Elyx and Tesla. With partners such as these, along with annual contests, financial security can be provided to MUSE School CA. MUSE School CA is an environmental non-profit educational organization Amis Cameron founded in Calabasas, Calif. with her sister Rebecca Amis. This assistance enables students to access a transformative educational experience. MUSE School CA ensures smaller class sizes, personalized instruction and learning practices; all set within an inspiring and beautiful campus. Through these key elements, MUSE School CA paves the way in creating leaders of the future. For more information, go to www.museschool.org.

Source RedCarpetGreenDress.com

1 March 2018 / Appearances Other News / No Comments

Film Independent has announced the final batch of presenters set to take the stage at the 33rd edition of the Independent Spirit Awards, which IFC will air live Saturday at 2 PM PT/5 PM ET.

Joining the roster of presenters are Call Me by Your Name‘s Timothée Chalamet (who’s up for Best Male Lead and also the best actor Oscar the next day), Robert Pattinson (also up for Best Male Lead for his role in Good Time), Spirit Award winner Janelle Monáe, Get Out scene-stealer Lil Rel Howery and awards-season MVP Michael Stuhlbarg. Rounding out the list of presenters are Zoey Deutch, Elizabeth Olsen, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Sarah Silverman. […]

SOURCE DEADLINE