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Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb talk to Zoey Deutch about her role as a misunderstood teenager in the upcoming film “Flower.”

Zoey Deutch goes all in for ‘Flower’ (The Last Magazine)

If most teen movies are concerned with a loss of innocence, then Max Winkler’s new film Flower, out this week and starring Zoey Deutch, is not your typical teen movie. In Flower, the 23-year-old Deutch plays Erica Vandross, a seventeen-year-old whose sexual confidence far outstrips her certainty in other parts of life. Her modus operandi is to offer blow jobs to men she can extort for money, saving up so that she can bail her father out of jail. The film starts with her giving one of these blow jobs to a policeman (“Where’d you learn to give head like that?” he gasps. “Middle school,” she says impassively) and ends with a visit to prison. In between, there’s a crusade to bring down a male teacher that her stepbrother Luke, played by Joey Morgan, has accused of molestation as well as a Thelma and Louise-esque escape attempt, with Luke and Erica speeding across a Joshua tree-punctuated landscape in a stolen Saab convertible and dressed in clothes seemingly inspired by Floridian retirees—Erica in particular has a penchant for flamingo-colored sunglasses and palm-tree prints. The showdown, when it comes, is emotional, not physical, and involves a seemingly innocuous moment that causes Erica to break down in Luke’s arms.

“I think that ultimately most movies portray vulnerability as a loss of innocence, but by the end of this movie, it’s the opposite direction,” says Deutch, who in real life speaks with the same breakneck cadence as her character. Though the plot is driven largely by some decisions of dubious morality on Erica’s part, the audience feels at least empathetic, if not quite sympathetic, toward her—a fact that speaks volumes about Deutch’s ability to tap into the subtleties of being human and, more specifically, a teenager who’s desperately trying to cover her fear of abandonment. “You have to believe that beyond all of Erica’s bravado there’s this fragile girl,” points out Deutch. “A movie like Flower is about the regaining of innocence and about the learning process of allowing yourself to be vulnerable.”

Continue reading Zoey Deutch goes all in for ‘Flower’ (The Last Magazine)